THE PUSSY HATS OF THE WOMEN’S MARCH What the hell is wrong here?

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Aren’t we Cute?

We recently witnessed a movement that is just plain pathetic. Millions of women and a few men have protested Donald Trump’s election with demonstrations whose trademark was the Pink Pussy Hat. HUH?

This failure to take women’s minds seriously, by large numbers of women who seem happy to confirm the most demeaning feminine stereotypes, is truly mind-boggling. The “inventors” nee promoters of this lame piece of apparell call it a “strong visual statement”. You bet. But what is it saying?

Although I realize  that these hats are meant to be ironic, their use as a symbol is reinforcing the same crap about women that has been spouted for millennia — women are other and are defined by their biology and hormones is misguided.  It is another acceptance of the old mansplaining admonition — “Don’t you worry your pretty little head about this, honey. It is just too difficult for you.”

If we want equality, shouldn’t we jetison this kind of thinking? If we want equality why must we turn every real, honest protest into something cute and tied to crafts? So many women who couldn’t make it to any march felt connected because they knited pink pussy hats for the marchers. Really? How about getting these women involved in truly meaningful ways, like voting and putting pressure on legislatures. Feel connected with your brain and your voice, not your knitting.

Of course, I am anti-crafts. Mostly because I have very little skill with my hands, but also because these activities scream “women’s work”. Yes, I know some men knit, but women’s reliance on busy work with their hands has been the hallmark of misplaced power. Women’s work is never done because so much of it is make work and silly stuff.

I like buying decorative items for my home and by body as much as the next woman, but dear god, it doesn’t define me. My intellect and my beliefs are what define me. My voice should be heard as much as any other person.

Then too, the Pussy Hats look like little cats with ears, but also are pink and suggestive of a woman’s labia. Perhaps it is time to drop the vagina as a protest symbol. Women aren’t supposed to be speaking to themselves in these protests. We are Way past raising awareness — or should be. Women are demanding power equal to men not because we have vaginas but because it does not matter that we have vaginas.

This anatomical focus erases women’s experience. Women are a caste within society, not because they are the owners of a particular body part. The vast majority of women do indeed have vaginas, but they aren’t preoccupied by that fact day to day. Vagina possession doesn’t explain why Mary voices an idea in a meeting but the boss listens only when Jim repeats it. When Kate does the dishes again, it isn’t because Bob’s genitalia prevented him from loading the dishwasher. It certainly is not a reason to pay women 80% of what men earn.

Yes, reproduction and child-care-related issues, not to mention sexual assault and domestic abuse, disproportionately affect women, and often involve women’s genitals. But even the women’s issues with some relationship to female anatomy aren’t really about vaginas.

We want to be seen as more than possessing vaginas. Our personhood is equal to all others. Don’t see me as a pussy — Donald don’t grab us by the pussy! It is degrading at the very least.
And yet – across the National Mall a sea of pink pussy hats takes the guts out of a massive and important demonstration.

The tyrany of madison avenue and the obscession with branding and logos no doubt is part of what brought this on. And sorry to say that women after years of prom planning and sorority rush and wedding decor don’t seem to get going on a project unless they know what the decor is. I recall my days in non-profit fundraising where the volunteers would spend countless womanhours working on the centerpieces and neglect the necessary task of the fundraising banquet — selling tickets. No butts in seats = no funds raised. The decor/centerpieces are not the important element of a successful fundraiser.

Please remember the medium is a big part of the message. I don’t think those of us demanding female rights in the 70’s would have thought the Pussy Hats were cute. But then, of course, we had to burn our bras and treat all the guys to a little skin. All this gets attention – but what kind of attention?

Women’s equality is a deadly serious business. Many men today want to reverse the strides made by the women’s movement and take us back to the days of asking our husbands for everything from money to control of our own bodies. They want to own our bodies and aren’t even willing to give us appropriate health care.

Time to get really angry — not time to get cute!

I was delighted to see that the Pussy Hats are marked down at the Nordstrom Half Yearly Sale – yes these symbols are mass produced. Maybe a few others figured out how frivolous a statement a knitted Pussy Hat makes about one-half the population denied equality.

I Certainly Hope So!

BOOK REVIEW The Shadow Sister (The Seven Sisters) by Lucinda Riley

Why Do I Keep Reading These Books?
I guess Lucinda Riley is a guilty pleasure. This is the third in her Seven Sister Series that I have read. I guess I’m a sucker for the greek astrological names and the ongoing mystery of these seven adopted girls named after the Seven Sisters of the Pleiads who grew up on the banks of Lake Geneva with adoptive parents Ma and Pa – he the ultra rich eccentric and she the unmarried earth mother.

Each Romance explores the back story of one girl — this one is about Star (Alcyone).
These are cozy mysteries with overtones of glam and exotic locales, stately homes, inheritances lost and found. Each girl is finding her origins and in so doing finding her future. Love of course plays a part, but you won’t find any soft core bodice ripping here. Love is chaste until – well it becomes perfect!
Lucinda gives us a few quirky supporting characters to keep us entertained and goes back in time for each girl so Historical Fiction buffs will be happy. (Shadow Sister is Edwardian with King Edward-Bertie and Beatrix Potter making appearances.)
At almost 500 pages, Lucinda gives you your money’s worth. There is a lot going on and a lot of detail in these books.
The next one promises to be about my least favorite sister, so maybe I will skip it. There is an overriding mystery about Pa that keeps you somewhat hooked — enough said. I gave it three stars.

NOT MY REVOLUTION Theatre Review Fusion Theatre, Albuquerque, NM

Written and performed by Elizabeth Huffman, Not My Revolution is a one-woman play/performance piece receiving its national debut at Fusion. The performance was substituted for the originally announced The Moors. I believe Fusion had problems with the rights for that play.

Ms Huffman is an international professional actress/director of Syrian heritage whose credits range from General Hospital to Sam Shepherd to West Side Story to the Circus. She now resides and works in Portland, Oregon and is active nationally and internationally as a guest artist, director and costumer designer. She is a mesmerizing mature actress at the top of her game who has worked with Fusion on several occasions.

Originally developed in Oregon as The Re-Imagining of French Gray by the Displaced Woman, the play melds the experiences of an upper class woman in Syria caught in the chaos of revolution with the imagined musings of Marie Antoinette in the French Revolution. A heady mix, to be sure, but Ms. Huffman navigates the myriad time slips with aplomb. Is the play the disjointed memory of a woman on the edge? A memory or a dream?
Laurie Thomas, co-founder and co-artistic chair of Fusion has taken on the task of directing Ms. Huffman and brings the considerable artistic resources of Fusion to staging the play. Of particular note is the sound design and the set/video design by Brent Stevens and Richard K. Hogue respectively. All enhance the performance and guide the audience through the swiftly shifting landscape of the play. Most one-person plays need a strong director and I suspect Ms. Thomas is responsible for much of the clarity of this performance.

This is a play worthy of Fusion’s commitment to professional standards and thought-provoking work. This theatre company is Albuquerque’s only fully professional theatre; Fusion is a great New Mexico cultural resource.